Top 10 things to do in Cambridge

Hello lovelies, I have been missing in action and hope to remedy it this week. I joined a new full-time job couple of weeks ago in digital marketing (yipee to me). From learning the ropes to adjusting to life as a full-time working mum it has taken a while to think of blogging posts. But I have started structuring my days better and hope to fit in weekly blogging now. Enough said as the title suggests, this travel post is about Cambridge.

This year, hubby and I decided to explore UK and tick off some places from our travel bucket list. As some of you know, summer has finally ended here (sigh!!) and to mark the event we visited Cambridge. Famous for its University, Cambridge is a lovely town with an eclectic mix of old world charm with modern, contemporary beauty. From a choice of galleries to a buzzing theatre scene; from jaw-dropping architectural beauty of college buildings to scenic walks, Cambridge has a lot to offer to the curious traveler. Here are my top ten picks tried and tested by me and the family.

Punting: 

Punting in Cambridge

This sounds almost like a cliche but punting is a quintessentially Cambridge experience that you should not miss. Cambridge derives its name from the River Cam which runs through its heart.

Punting enables you to see the “backs” of the seven famous colleges from the comfort of a traditional Cambridge punt whilst your “driver” takes you through the enticing history of Cambridge, the colleges and its environs. I cannot recommend this activity enough and what’s more it can be done during a rainy day too (if not raining heavily).

Flitzwilliam museum:

Cambridge attractions

There are several museums in Cambridge but this definitely takes the prize. The intricate architecture on the front gate was enticing enough for me to step inside this museum and I was genuinely bowled over. It is a fascinating place with collections from all the world and various eras too plus it is free to enter.

From medieval armours and weapons collection to Egyptian collection, from Greek collection to the early works of Michelangelo made just before he was about to embark on his famous Sistine Chapel work, Flitzwilliam museum is a must if you love art, culture and history.

College tours: 

Cambridge attractions

Cambridge attractions

A visit to Cambridge is incomplete without touring some of the colleges. Visitors can enter the college grounds (to some extent) on weekends. My favourite was Christ College, Trinity and Kings College.

Bridge of sighs:

Bridge of Sighs Cambridge

This is covered bridge built on the grounds of St. John’s College. A namesake bridge it was named after the Bridge of Sighs in Venice. Built in 1831, ever since it has built, there have been fierce debates on which bridge is better. It is supposed to be Queen Victoria’s favourite spot in the city.

A common myth surrounding its name is that the students named it Bridge of Sighs as it was a favourite spot for pre-exam students to come here and let out a little sigh. It is also rumoured that this was former Singaporean Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew’s favourite place as he was also the student of the college.

Market Square:

Market square Cambridge

Although there are more interesting local markets I’ve visited in other cities, I would still recommend Cambridge’s market square as it is a great place to imbibe local culture, shop local products and meet some brilliant local artists. Plus, who doesn’t love browsing through interesting artefacts peculiar to a city?

Holy Sepulchre or Round Church:

Round Church, Cambridge

You don’t have to be religious to appreciate this Church. There is a definite melancholy feeling to this Church. Built entirely of stone, this is one of the four original medieval round churches still use in England. The Church was built around 1130 and its shape was inspired by the rotunda in the church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem. Large Gothic style windows and glass paintings adorn it from the inside.

Kings College:

kings college cambridge

cambridge attractions

Kings college is synonymous to Cambridge.Founded in 1441 by Henry VI and the earliest of the royal foundations, King’s College is worth visiting for the huge expanse of lawn extending down to the river, the King’s Bridge with its brilliant views along the Backs and the various college grounds situated along the riverside.

Seriously if I was lucky (or academically/ financially strong) to be a student here, I would never study but spend my days admiring the jaw-dropping beauty of the place or exploring the various nooks and crannies. It is definitely a place I would need to visit again to explore properly. Distinguished alumni include writer Horace Walpole, poet Rupert Brooke and economist Lord Keynes.

Street Food:

I am a self-confessed lover of street food and I find it a tad disappointing that not all UK towns and cities have a good variety of street food however Cambridge doesn’t disappoint you. From variety of mouth-watering cheeses to local ale to yummy toasties to scrumptious and healthy buckwheat crepes, the street food scene will sill your hungry stomach and soul in one go.

Corpus Clock: 

Image by: Wikimedia Commons, Rror

Image by: Wikimedia Commons, Rror

The Corpus Clock is a large structural clock locatedat the junction of Bene’t Street and Trumpington Street, looking out over King’s Parade. Bollywood lovers would have seen it in the movie Paa. It was unveiled to public in 2008 by physicist Stephen Hawking.

The clock’s face is a rippling 24-carat gold-plated stainless steel disc, about 1.5 metres in diameter. The clock has no hands or numerals, but displays time by opening individual slits in the clock face backlit with blue LEDs; these slits are arranged in three concentric rings displaying hours, minutes, and seconds. A metallic, huge grasshopper is the dominating feature of the clock and actually works as a pendulum. This feature,the grasshopper escapement is an unusual, low-friction escapement for pendulum clocks invented by British clockmaker John Harrison around 1722. The grasshopper in Corpus Clock is a homage to Harrison.

Christ’s Pieces: 

Image by: Wikimedia Commons , Mincebert

Image by: Wikimedia Commons , Mincebert

Cambridge is renowned for its green spaces and you will be spoilt for choice to choose a place to enjoy a spot of sunshine. I really loved Christ’s Pieces a victorian park with pretty flower beds and ornamental trees. It was previously used for agricultural and pasture purposes. Poet John Milton, who frequented this park has a dedicated walk–Milton Walk here too.

Thank you for reading. Hope you liked this travel post. Have a great week ahead and don’t forget to follow me 🙂

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2 Comments

  1. September 9, 2015 / 11:47 am

    Informative 🙂 Thanks for sharing

    • September 16, 2015 / 7:20 pm

      thanks Lerry for reading 🙂

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