Hello, my lovely readers couple of weeks ago I found that I have been selected as one of the ambassadors and guest bloggers for the upcoming Oxford Fashion Week.   Needless to say, I am supremely excited and chuffed that I have been selected.

This year Oxford Fashion Week is part of Oxford Fashion Studio who are launching the 2015 season of runway shows from September through to November and includes runway shows in New York, Paris, Oxford, Houston and Los Angeles.

For the uninitiated, the Oxford Fashion Studio does an amazing job of discovering and supporting brilliant emerging designers from all over the world. At the heart of Oxford Fashion Studio is a love for brilliant design and a respect for how it invites us to experience life differently. Oxford Fashion Studio runway shows exhibit extraordinary designs from exceptional established and emerging designers.

Oxford Fashion Week

Oxford Fashion Week

If you would like to experience a glamorous evening with talented designers and fashion lovers from around the world then do not forget to mark your calendar. Oxford Fashion Week will be taking place on 31st October at exquisite The Sheldonian theatre designed by Sir Christopher Wren.

Some of the designer who will be gracing the event are: Emma Gilligan (Jewellery) Collection name: Made by E.M.M.A, designer Lavinia Cadar Collection name: Cuba Cubismo and designer: Barkers-Woode Collection name: Queen.

There are two Runway Shows:-

  • The 6pm Independent Collection Show
  • The 9pm Couture Collection Show

Tickets can be purchased via the website by clicking the link below:
http://www.oxfordfashionstudio.com/tickets/.

Oxford Fashion Week

Oxford Fashion Week

So, will you be attending this spectacular and inspiring night? Well, I certainly hope so and see you there 🙂

Image credit: All Images are provided by the Oxford Fashion Studio

Hope you enjoyed this post. Have a great week ahead and for more such interesting ideas don’t forget to follow me 🙂

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The truth about British Summer is that the whole year you wait for it with baited breath before losing all interest and lo and behold it happens when you least expect it. The whole of last week, we had sun playing a nasty game of hide and seek. I was convinced it would be a typical washed out weekend but suddenly I woke up to a gloriously shining sun last Saturday. I am definitely an opportunity seeker so without further ado, I coaxed the hubby, dressed the little one and hopped on to the car for a day out at Durdle Door, Dorset.

Druilde Door Reviews

Druilde Door and Lulworth Cove

Durdle Door has been on my travel bucket list ever since hubby visited it few years ago without me but something or the other kept me away till now. I’ve often experienced that when I build up a place too much in my little head it falls extremely short of my expectations in reality. Hence, I was beyond chuffed when we reached this Jurassic Coast after a nice little drive all the way from Hampshire. Durdle Door does not disappoint you no matter what your traveling style is.

Druilde Door and Lulworth Cove

Within a mile or so of the place, you will see the rugged terrain of the mountains juxtaposing beautifully with sparkling azure water of the sea and a horizon that feels like you can almost touch it. This is your cue to Durdle Door.

The actual “door” itself is a nice, long trek away from the car park. There are several tricky pathways giving you a nice view of Dorset while you head towards the beach. Be mindful of the path as it can be slippery and challenging at the same time. After a bit of a walk you reach a plateau with Durdle Door on one hand and the Man of War beach and Lulworth Cove on the other hand. To navigate either side you need to trek downwards a slightly steep slope.

Durdle door, dorset

Durdle Door , Dorset

But once you have done this trek, you will see one of the most gorgeous spots on this earth (I kid you not!). Durdle Door and the Lulworth Cove form part of the Jurassic Coastline. And true to its moniker, the iconic Durdle door even resembles a dinosaur.

Dorset Lulworth Cove

This natural door on the sea along with an expansive pebble beach is definitely one of the jaw-dropping beautiful spots I’ve seen while the beach on the other side with a great view of the sea is something which will stop your senses right away. I recommend you don’t rush but slowly savour the incredible beauty of the place and let it envelop you completely because after all isn’t that what travel is all about—to take you out of the mundane and tease all your senses in one go?

PS: These photos are completely unedited, I wanted to show the place in all its natural glory

Thank you for reading. Hope you liked this travel post. Have a great week ahead and don’t forget to follow me 🙂

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Stratford-upon-Avon, situated on the river Avon in the English county of Warwickshire, is decidedly an idyllic town. Best known to be the birthplace and hometown of William Shakespeare, Stratford-upon-Avon is a town where time meanders slowly, cut off from the cantankerous spirit of a bustling city. As you enter this town’s winding little streets you will notice that Shakespeare still continues to dominate the place. The five Bard-linked properties: Shakespeare’s birthplace ( image below), Nash’s house, Hall’s Croft, New Place and Anne Hathway (Shakespeare’s wife) Cottage remains the heart of this town and it continues to draw travelers from all over UK and world even now.

Shakespeare's House UK attractions

Our first stop was Henley Street, where stands the famous landmark—Shakespeare’s birth house. It is quite easy to spot the house. Among the plethora of new age shops, tiny, intimate cafes and teahouses stands a half timber house where Shakespeare was born and brought up along with his brothers and sisters. As you enter the house, you will first notice a hall of fame which includes names like Judi Dench, Star Trek’s Patrick Stewart and former Doctor Who David Tennant, all of whom have enjoyed acclaim in Shakespearean roles at Stratford in addition to their on-screen stardom.

In the Courtyard, between the reception centre and the House, you would see costumed actors performing snippets from some of the best-known plays. The managers who run the show today have made quite an effort to retain the authenticity of the house; you will notice how the parlour, the hall, Shakespeare’s dad’s workshop and bed chamber are furnished as they might have looked in 1574 (unfortunately, there is a no photography policy). An exhibition runs which tells us about the times gone by and explains how part of the house became a public house in 1601. My favourite bit of the house? A literary graffiti featuring autographs of literary gems like Ivanhoe’s writer Walter Scott’s signature. This, I thought truly made the house a literature haven.

stratford-upon-Avon UK attractions

UK attractions Stratford-Upon-Avon

From here, we headed towards the Holy trinity Church in-between stopping at the Stratford Upon Avon Canal, which was built between 1793 and 1816. A spot to enjoy some peace and quiet, the Canal does not offer much except wind-swept trees looking rather stupendous in twilight, clear water, panoramic view of the town and a peaceful silence to keep you for company.

The Church and the canal is separated by an intimate garden. A gurgling stream giving out a beautiful reflection of the Church, evening winter mist hanging around its vicinity and tall, almost kissing trees on both sides gives this place an almost eerie feeling but it somehow added to its uninhibited, natural charm.

UK attractions travel

Holy Trinity Church UK travel attractions

The Holy Trinity Church also popularly called Shakespeare’s Church is the place where Shakespeare is buried. The Church has an attractive approach; with its pathway lined by trees that represent the tribes of Israel and the 12 Apostles. Holy Trinity Church was one of the first churches in England where an admission fee was charged; even in 1906 visitors were asked to pay six pence each to enter.

Shakespeare, apparently died on his 52nd birthday of a fever which was said at the time to have been the result of a ‘merry meeting’ with fellow poets Ben Jonson and Michael Drayton. It is believed they all drank too much in that meeting.

Holy Trinity Church, UK attractions

As night was falling rapidly, we decided to call it a day and started our way back home but we walked past the old town briefly stopping before Hall’s Croft formerly the home of Shakespeare’s daughter Susannah and her husband Doctor John Hall. This White painted carved house lends the street a dignified character; it also feels that the place is slightly struck in a time warp with vintage style houses flanking its sides. Wondering how Shakespeare’s lineage ended? The death of childless Elizabeth (his granddaughter) in 1670 brought Shakespeare’s direct line of descent to an end.

UK travel attractions

Stratford-Upon-Avon is a town steeped in history, natural beauty, legacy and literature. It is also the town where theatre continues to mushroom. The Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) runs four theatres here: the Courtyard theatre, the Royal Shakespeare theatre, the Swan theatre and the other place. Unfortunately, because of time constraint we couldn’t experience the theatre scene but that gives me a reason to go back.

As a style-lover and a compulsive people watcher, I love exploring a city’s markets.

 

The famous London Eye

 London Eye

For me, they are the ultimate representation of a city’s personality. Away from the comforts of fancy ad gimmick and stripped of any artificial airs, markets are where you see the city in its true colours while indulging in some shameless people watching. Exploring a market is not just about shopping it’s about experiencing a city’s raw character, coming in touch with its rugged personality and getting acquainted with its many shades. Markets unlike malls also have uniqueness to them that can never be matched up. Of course, the fashionista in me is always beaming after getting her hands on that one unique piece.

London, as we all know, is one of the best shopping places. Whilst names like Harrods and Selfridges have put London as a shopping paradise for the swish set; there’s definitely more to London’s shopping landscape than the glittery malls. I bring to you three of the best shopping and people watching haunts of London—the Brick Lane Market, the Camden Market and Spitalfields Market.

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Brick Lane Market: A study in culture and contradictions, this market is located on the northern end of Brick Lane along Cheshire Street in East London. In Brick Lane, posh boutiques stand in sharp contrast with rickety stalls selling a plethora of eclectic goods from old books, antique cameras, and vintage clothes to cutesy bric-a-brac. This place is popularized by bargain hunters, art students and curry houses, It’s unpolished, little wild, rough around the edges and definitely unafraid. And true to London’s multicultural fabric, Brick Lane is a place where people from all different cultures, backgrounds come together to clash and cherish. Brick Lane’s vibe can be summed up in two words—wild and eclectic.

Camden Lock

 

Camden Market

 

 

Camden Market

 

Camden Market: One of the oldest markets of London, it has been the home ground for musical legends like Ian Drury and Amy Winehouse. Situated between Camden Town and Chalk farm, the Camden Markets give you a sneak peek to the city’s vibrant street culture. Saunter around its narrow pathways and you will soon realise that this is a place where alternative culture could have born. You will see an array of shops selling everything from Goth, Punk to vintage lifestyles.

 

Via: Wikimedia Commons

Via: Wikimedia Commons

Spitalfield Market: The Old Spitalfield Market (pictured above) located in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, closest to Liverpool Street tube station, is home to an old-fashioned community of over 30 independent and large traders and a plethora of chic bohemian businesses. The market is a treasure trove of eclectic interiors and design, scrumptious street food and quirky art.Nothing represents the consumer’s diversity and individuality like this market and at the same time it is a cultural and entrepreneurial melting pot.  If you love antiques – especially  Victorian ones then this market should not be missed. But a word of caution: the real antiques market is open only on Thursdays and like every other market in the world, there are numerous vendors who will try to fool you with their “iconic” finds. So have a discerning eye. If you are tired of rummaging through retro finds, then give your taste buds some exercise by digging into some farmers’ cheese and other delicious delights.

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Yes, I want some change too

The world is really divided into two groups—one who loves Brick Lane and one who loathes it. One can only sympathise with the latter for Brick Lane is not your ordinary Sunday market but a maelstrom of different cultures, people and persuasions meant for the open-minded and the adventurous at heart. It’s a place where Western promise meets East End madness and the result is truly mind blowing. Get up early on a Sunday morning and head towards the market, located on the northern end of Brick Lane and along Cheshire Street in East London.

Brick Lane market is not easy to miss; it’s a place where posh boutiques stand in comfortable ease with ramshackle stalls selling a plethora of eclectic goods from old books, antique cameras, vintage clothes to cutesy bric-a-brac. A place popularised by bargain hunters, art students and curry houses, Brick Lane is the part skipped by tourists in their luxury cars. It is unpolished, little wild, rough around the edges and absolutely unafraid.

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Whatcha looking at?

Don’t miss the Vintage market put up at the Truman Brewery every Sunday between 10AM-5PM. It’s a place where you will find arrays of stalls peppered with accessories, glam fur coats, vintage frocks and men’s suits from 1920s to the 1990s.

Whilst there are many Indian and Bangladeshi curry houses, on Sundays, the market is bustling with food vendors offering cuisines from every corner of the planet. Chomp in some authentic Ethiopian food or sip Turkish coffee, dig in Chowmein from Tibet or have a tasty dish of Pad Thai. The food like everything else here perfectly embodies the rich cultural diversity that London itself offers.

Saunter around its dynamic streets and indulge in shameless people-watching. Wherever you go peppy street music and colourful street art pleasantly accompanies you. In short, Brick Lane is a bundle of contradictions—it’s ordinary yet extraordinary, predictable yet exotic, bizarre yet classic.

Just don’t forget to reach early (around 9AM) to get the best bargains. The nearest tube is Aldgate East and overground is Liverpool Street. And bring some cash; finding a cash machine in this labyrinth is tougher than solving the riddle of Mona Lisa.

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   How Welcoming